Archive for the ‘How To & Tips’ Category

6 Days to Cancer Ride + Almond Butter Power Fuel in Pictures

6 days to the Central Mass. Bicycles Battling Cancer ride (please consider donating – I’m just about half way to my $300 goal). Almond butter will certainly be part of the breakfast I have to power that ride next Sunday. I had a fat tablespoon of it just now with French toast (made with killeer BirchTree Bread Co. seeded levain bread) to prep for a 30+ mile I’ll take later this morning. Here’s what you need to make almond butter on your own.

The food processor does all the work (yah, you definitely need a food processor). You just have to clean the food processor when it’s done – but that cleaning is well worth the incredibly fresh, rich flavor.  Click any picture on this page for complete step-by-step picture book directions that, you bet, include how to clean a food processor (sometimes you just can’t have too much fun!).

Fuel up, ride on!

19 Days To Bikes Battling Cancer Ride and How to Cut Avocados Safely

Avocados are packed with health-promoting, anti-inflammatory whole body nutrients, which makes them great for those of us who keep our bodies active (click this link to a comprehensive avocado nutrition article from Medical News Today and this link to the World’s Healthiest Foods detailed description of avocado nutrition and preparation tips). I’m planning to have a good shot of avocado when I get back from a training ride around lunchtime. (19 days until the Bicycles Battling Cancer ride and still plenty of time to contribute to its very worthy cause by clicking this link.)

Regarding avocado prep, you might’ve seen some recent headlines like those shown above. The problem: people cutting Read more »

Love Fresh Chop Garlic But Don’t Know How to Chop It? Check Out These Picture Book Directions

Chopping Fresh GarlicThere’s nothing quite like the magnetic scent of freshly cut garlic to attract attention to action in the kitchen. And then, of course, there’s nothing like the fantastic punch of flavor freshly chopped garlic adds to any recipe you’re preparing.

First, here’s what to look for when you buy fresh garlic at the grocery store. For optimal flavor and ease of chopping, select fresh garlic bulbs that are firm to the touch and heavier in weight, not those that are dried out, spongy soft, and lighter in weight as shown in the comparison pictures below. Also, avoid garlic bulbs that have started to sprout green shoots or show signs of dark colored mold on or under the bulb’s papery white skin. Finally, select garlic bulbs with bigger garlic cloves as bigger cloves are a lot easier to peel and chop than smaller cloves. Read more »

Stress-Free Roast Turkey Picture Book Recipe

stress-free-roast-turkey

Years ago I put together what I thought was the most stress-free roast turkey picture book recipe available. That recipe produced terrifically tender results because it required roasting the turkey at consistently high heat (450℉/230℃) mostly with the bird in a breast-side down position. Leaving the the turkey breast-side down for most of the roasting time protects the more delicate breast meat from direct heat and also allows the fat in turkey’s legs and thighs to baste the rest of the bird naturally by gravity. That technique, though, has two significant drawbacks: high heat roasting works well only for turkeys weighing up to 15 pounds and consistent high heat roasting temperature creates a lot of smoke in the kitchen. Read more »

Oven Roasted Butternut Squash Picture Book Recipe

oven-roasted-butternut-squash

The toughest part about roasting butternut squash, if you want it in cubed shaped pieces the way you see above, is removing the outer skin as shown in the picture below. After removing the skin (I recommend using a tougher vegetable peeler than the weak and worthless one you see here), roasting is the easiest, most flavorful way I know to prepare butternut squash.

peeling-skin-from-butternut-squash

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How to Cook Steel Cut Oats Picture Book Recipe

Steel Cut Oats Ingredients

Steel cut oats: nutty flavor, complete protein source, complex carbohydrate, fiber rich, anti-inflammatory, and highly versatile in both sweet and savory recipes. Great stuff! Here’s how they look compared to rolled oats.

Rolled Oats and Steel Cut Oats ComparisonWant to know more about what steel cut oats are, why they’re a bit more nutritional than rolled oats, and how to cook them as easily as possible (they take about 25 minutes to cook – almost completely hands-free)? Just click any picture on this page for a complete, easy-to-follow step-by-step picture book recipe. Read more »

How to Grate or Chop Fresh Ginger Picture Book Directions

How to Grate & Chop Fresh Ginger

Fresh ginger. A staple of eastern cooking. Fantastically flavorful – I use it almost as much as I use fresh garlic…and almost always with fresh garlic. Ginger is the thick root of the tropically grown ginger plant with a great reputation for its anti-inflammatory properties that include easing stomach discomfort, improving digestion, and stimulating blood circulation.

The only problem: how to get a piece of ginger root from this…

…to this as quickly and easily as possible.
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How to Ripen and Cut a Mango – All in Pictures

Cutting a mangoAs noted in the article below, mangoes are considered the most consumed fruit in the world – and for good reason. They’re full of tropical flavor and rich in nutrients and fiber. For details, including mango health benefits and recipe ideas, click the picture below for a link to an April 2014 Medical News Today article.

Medical News Today Mango Article Read more »

How to Cook Dried Garbanzo Beans (Chickpeas) – All in Pictures

Cooked Garbanzo Beans (Chickpeas)If you’re not familiar with garbanzo beans or chickpeas, they are nut-like in flavor, versatile, richly nutritious (especially regarding protein an fiber), and extraordinarily appetite-satisfying. Below is a summary of nutrition facts (164 grams is 1 cup of cooked garbanzo beans), which you can click for a full garbanzo bean nutrition graphic posted by Condé Nast that was derived from USDA information.

USDA Garbanzo Beans (Chickpeas) Nutrition

NOTE: If you’re not used to eating foods high in fiber, like these beans, you can acclimate your body and minimize uncomfortable bloating by starting with a small amount of beans added to your meal and then steadily increasing that amount. I followed that advice myself, and it worked out great.

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Excellent Illustrated Guide to Cooking Oils and How to Use Them

Just got an email from fix.com with the concise, illustrated article printed below about the difference between cooking oils regarding their smoke points (temperature at which they start to smoke), nutrition, source, flavor, and best use – all in alphabetical order. Terrific reference that I’ll be sure to use. Thanks, Fix!

Nut, Seed, and Flower Oils – Which Cooking Oil to Use When

From deep-fried foods to healthy salads, cooking oils play a part in the flavor profile and healthiness of many meals. With such a huge range of nut, seed, and flower oils on the market to choose from, all boasting their own array of nutritional and superfood benefits, it can be hard to know where to start.

Consider the smoke point when selecting an oil to cook with. The temperature at which a type of oil begins to smoke and burn will play a huge factor in the dishes you should use it in. Will you be cooking your food hot and fast? If that’s the case you might want to avoid the delicious and flavorful extra virgin olive oil, which begins to smoke at 320 degrees F, and instead opt for an oil with a higher smoke point, like avocado oil, which smokes at a searing 520 degrees F.

Then there’s your waistline and general health to consider. It’s no secret all oils contain fats, but consulting our list will teach the levels of mono-saturated, mono-unsaturated, and poly-unsaturated fats in 15 popular nut, seed, and flower oils, allowing you to choose the oil that’s right for you.

Will you be stir-frying your next meal? Try almond oil, avocado oil, olive oil, or walnut oil. Feel like a toasty flavor in your next salad dressing? Perhaps sesame oil should be your oil of choice. From flavor profiles to best applications, as well as interesting information on the derivation of each oil from its plant source, see the infographic below for everything you need to know about cooking oils and more.

Source: Fix.com

 

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